Podcast Episode 21: Wealthy Single Moms

Podcast Episode 21: Wealthy Single Moms

Thanks so much for coming by to check out Episode 21 of The New Family Podcast!

For this episode, I chat with business journalist and mom of two Emma Johnson. Emma is the host of a podcast called Like a Mother with Emma Johnson, and she’s also the woman behind the popular website Wealthy Single Mommy. Is Wealthy Single Mommy a contradiction in terms? Hell no! Emma explains how she overcame the initial hangups she had when her marriage ended—that becoming a single mother meant being a welfare mom who would always struggle financially and in life in general. When she launched her blog geared to other professional single moms, the response was incredible. The number one challenge Emma’s readers share with her is fear about running into financial problems. So Emma has recently launched an online course called “How Not to be a Broke Single Mom,” as well as a dynamic Facebook group called “Single Mom Society.” Emma’s message is empowering and inspiring to all moms, regardless of their circumstances.

Here are some great resources related to my discussion with Emma.

Emma’s blog Wealthy Single Mommy

Emma’s podcast Like a Mother With Emma Johnson

How Not to be a Broke Single Mom course

How to join Emma’s secret Facebook Group, Single Mom Society

Emma’s Favourite Parenting Advice:
“You’re doing a good job.”

Sponsor for this Episode:

Ooka Island

This episode is brought to you by Ooka Island, a reading app so fun your kids won’t even realize they’re learning. To try the first level for FREE—that’s about an hour and a half of educational screen time you can feel good about—just go to ookaisland.com/newfamily.

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Brandie Weikle

About

Brandie is a long-time parenting editor, writer and spokesperson. Most recently editor-in-chief of Canadian Family magazine, Brandie has also been the parenting and relationships editor for the Toronto Star, founding editor of two Toronto Star websites, and an editor for Today's Parent. Brandie is a single mother of two in Toronto and a frequent television and radio guest on parenting topics. A former digital director at House & Home Media, she also consults on digital audience engagement. Contact her here.


'Podcast Episode 21: Wealthy Single Moms' have 3 comments

  1. November 24, 2015 @ 7:38 pm coffee with julie

    I think the “poor” connotations that come with “single mom” come from the definition of a mother raising children completely on her own (i.e. no co-parenting, no child payment cheques, etc). I always find it a bit odd when I hear a woman refer to herself as a “single mom” when she’s not actually parenting alone (she has a former spouse or partner co-parenting with her in some shape or form). I think it’s just me getting used to a new version of the word. I also hear “single dad” these days too, which I never used to, so I guess the vernacular is changing.

    Reply

    • Brandie Weikle

      December 7, 2015 @ 11:35 pm Brandie Weikle

      Good points, Julie. I do think the vernacular is changing. I use the words “single mom” to describe myself even though I’m distinctly aware that a) their dad is fully involved and b) the term conjures up images of much less privileged circumstances than mine. To me the term refers to me being single and a parent, meaning that I’m the only one putting this roof over their heads (no partner with whom to split the bills, or to wash the dishes because I’ve made dinner). Interesting how these things evolve over time. Thanks so much for listening!

      Reply


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